puzzles TZAAR, DVONN, LYNGK

6 replies. Last post: 2007-04-11

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puzzles
  • Paavo Pirinen at 2007-02-16

    Self made dvonn puzzles, with a whacky story (skip to the end if you do not want a whacky story).

    Once in a near future there was a great dvonn master, and that dvonn master was looking for an apprentice. Thus it happened, that three young dvonn players came to his door, each hoping to become the master's new apprentice. The master let all three in, eyed them carefully and spoke:

    “You have travelled a long road and are tired. Eat and rest here now. Tomorrow I'll play a game of dvonn against each of you, and by those games I will decide, if any of you is fit to be my apprentice. But as you are all young players and I am a master, I will even things out a bit. I'll let you play white and create what ever setup you want. Be warned though, once moving stacks begins, I'll play as well as I can.”

    The master made a shrewd smile, began to laugh and walked away. His friends served the three candidates a dinner and then led them to their rooms.

    All three had a same thought. The master knew perfectly well, that given a certain kind of a setup the rest of the game can be played so, that the opponent can make no moves. Thus it had to be, that the master was actually asking them to device solo games that would show him their wits and character.

    The first candidate liked precision and simplicity. For him every win was as good as another no matter how big or small was the difference between stacks. Usually when his games were near to an end and already decided, he chose moves that would result the quickest (yet still certain) victory - even if that would lose him rings. Anything else would be, he thought, vain and unnecessary.

    This first candidate decided he would play a game where the master could not make a single move - but not only that. The candidate would also win the game with as few moves as possible.

    The second candidate was a straightforward guy. When he played, he played each and every move as well as he could - and his ultimate goal was always to maximize height of his stacks and minimize height of his opponent's stacks. He did not want to do clever tricks, he wanted to play strong.

    This second candidate also decided he would play a game where the master could not make a single move, but of course he would do even more. The candidate would also not lose a single ring, he would capture them all - and in the end he would have no more than three stacks.

    The third candidate liked to play for fun as much as for victory. He liked to do witty and unexpected moves. Sometimes he even lost games because of giving second chances or doing dangerous moves instead of certain ones.

    This third candidate also decided he would play a game where the master could not make a single move, but the candidate would also play only as long as it would take to reach a situation, where the master would have stacks (all summed together of course) of more value than himself. Then he would shout “Master, you haven't made a single move and yet you already have a lead! I resign!” and hopefully the game would end with a good laughter.

    Can you create a setup and a game from there on for each candidate?

    In short:

    a) Create a setup and a game from there onwards so, that the white will win with as few moves as possible. The black must be made to pass his every move (he will not resign).

    b) Create a setup and a game from there onwards so, that the white will win with no more than three stacks and all 49 rings in those stacks. The black must be made to pass his every move (he will not resign).

    c) Create a setup and a game from there onwards so, that a situation will be reached, where the black has more rings in his stacks than the white. The black must be made to pass his every move (he will not resign).

    Sorry about my english. It could be worse, but it could be better. The puzzles are not sorted by difficulty - b is probably the most difficult. I would not try these (at least not b) without a dvonn board.

    …oh, and I can provide answers if needed.

  • XanderN at 2007-02-19

    A - I can solve quite easily with 4 moves for white

    B - I will think of when I have a board, the concept of how to play is quite easy to figure out.

    C - is not possible in my opinion. If black is passing every move, that implies the highest stack black can have is a single stone. To have single stones at the end of the game, they must be surrounded by white towers (since white stones can move) and the 3 red stones. Maybe I need to puzzle longer, but I dont think immobile white towers can surrender block singles stones and be outnumbered by the black stones. The thing which comes closest to what is asked is a single black stone making one move at the end of the game when all white stones are gone. I am curious the know the solution that does satisfy the puzzle if I am wrong here.

    xandern

  • Paavo Pirinen at 2007-02-19

    Oh yes. I didn't suppose to be able to create hard puzzles for the most experienced players.

    C is possible (even quite easy), but easy to miss interpret the way I wrote it. When I say “a situstion will be reached” I don't mean the situation at the end of the game (the story mode made that clearer, sorry). White will indeed win eventually if black must always pass.

    When I was creating the puzzles, I first thought to create a C puzzle that would demand a game where black makes excaclty one move, and what ever move he makes, he'll be made to win (then his move can't be the last one though). I didn't solve that, but it seems very much possible, just a lot of work.

  • Paavo Pirinen at 2007-02-19

    “White will indeed win eventually if black must always pass.”

    Ups. Sorry. Win, draw or resign.

  • XanderN at 2007-02-20

    Another Dvonn puzzle (but this one requires the cooperation of both players): play the game in such a way that you end with a stack which is 49 stones high.

    Xander

  • Paavo Pirinen at 2007-04-11

    Let's have solutions here also.

    Made (mostly) with Matthias Bodenstein's Dvonner:

    A

    As far as I know four non pass moves is the minimum even with cooperative playing.

    B

    If we count passes as moves, I believe this, with colours reversed, is the longest Dvonn game possible.

    C

    I believe that this, with trivial alterations like differently placed dvonn stones, is the only possible solution to the puzzle.

    Xandern's puzzle

    Very fundamental. Also longest dvonn game, if passes are not counted as moves. Now if someone could determine all the possible places 49-stack can be built on…

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